Our mission is to provide the first non-pharmacological topic treatment. The first goal is to fill the existing MARKET GAP in PEDIATRIC dermatology, focusing on Atopic Dermatitis.

To make this possible we developed a medical device, called LimpiAD, using a biotechnology platform (HAS50) involving non pathogenic bacteria.

HAS50

The product has proven to be safe, optimally tolerated and effective in the topical treatment of mild to moderate Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD) and is currently tested for pediatric Atopic Dermatitis. Seeing the interaction of the cutaneous microbiota in diseases such as Psoriasis and Acne, the next company goal is to test it also on these pathologies. HAS50 treatments are able to compete with current invasive therapeutic approaches which are not well accepted by all patients.

These features make HAS50 a great and innovative product in a market that has not seen innovation for many years.

HAS50

The product has proven to be safe, optimally tolerated and effective in the topical treatment of mild to moderate Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD) and is currently tested for pediatric Atopic Dermatitis. Seeing the interaction of the cutaneous microbiota in diseases such as Psoriasis and Acne, the next company goal is to test it also on these pathologies. HAS50 treatments are able to compete with current invasive therapeutic approaches which are not well accepted by all patients.

These features make HAS50 a great and innovative product in a market that has not seen innovation for many years.

HAS50 project platform

HAS50 device involves the use of non-pathogenic bacterial fragment (cellular wall), that could be naturally present on human skin, subsequently submitted to chemical conjugation with mucopolysaccharides acting as carriers. HAS50 has been shown to be very effective in a prospective pilot open-label study has been showing the effectiveness of this product in reducing the signs and symptoms of oxazolone-induced dermatitis (13).

A Proof-of-Concept Study has been done showing the effectiveness of this product in reducing the signs and symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis of the face and chest. The use of HAS50 5% reduced significantly IGA score by 67% at week 3 and by 83% at week 6. HAS50 was effective in reducing erythema, scale, seborrhoea, and itch and was very well tolerated. No local side effects were reported. (14).

HAS50 project platform

HAS50 device involves the use of non-pathogenic bacterial fragment (cellular wall), that could be naturally present on human skin, subsequently submitted to chemical conjugation with mucopolysaccharides acting as carriers. HAS50 has been shown to be very effective in a prospective pilot open-label study has been showing the effectiveness of this product in reducing the signs and symptoms of oxazolone-induced dermatitis (13).

A Proof-of-Concept Study has been done showing the effectiveness of this product in reducing the signs and symptoms of seborrheic dermatitis of the face and chest. The use of HAS50 5% reduced significantly IGA score by 67% at week 3 and by 83% at week 6. HAS50 was effective in reducing erythema, scale, seborrhoea, and itch and was very well tolerated. No local side effects were reported. (14).

References

1. Belkaid Y, Hand TW. Role of the microbiota in immunity and inflammation. Cell. 2014;157(1):121-41.
2. Grice EA, Kong HH, Conlan S, Deming CB, Davis J, Young AC, et al. Topographical and temporal diversity of the human skin microbiome. Science. 2009;324(5931):1190-2.
3. Lee N, Kim WU. Microbiota in T-cell homeostasis and inflammatory diseases. Exp Mol Med. 2017;49(5):e340.
4. Gallo RL. Human skin is the largest epithelial surface for interaction with microbes. J Invest Dermatol. 2017;137:1213-1214.
5. Cogen AL, Nizet V, Gallo RL. Skin microbiota: a source of disease or defence?.Br J Dermatol. 2008; 158(3):442-55.
6. Teruaki Nakatsuji, Richard L. Gallo. The role of the skin microbiome in atopic dermatitis. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2018.12.003
7. Geoghegan JA, Irvine AD, Foster TJ. Staphylococcus aureus and Atopic Dermatitis: A Complex and Evolving Relationship. Trends Microbiol.2018;26(6):484-97.
8. Nutten S. Atopic dermatitis: global epidemiology and risk factors. Ann Nutr Metab.2015;66 Suppl 1:8-16.

9. Lifschitz C. The impact of atopic dermatitis on quality of life. Ann Nutr Metab.2015;66 Suppl 1:34-40.
10. Fernandez JM, Fernandez AP, Lang DM. Biologic Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Skin Disorders. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2017;37(2):315-27
11. Coondoo A, Phiske M, Verma S, Lahiri K. Side-effects of topical steroids: A long overdue revisit. Indian Dermatol Online J. 2014;5(4):416-25.
12. Li AW, Yin ES, Antaya RJ. Topical Corticosteroid Phobia in Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review. JAMA Dermatol. 2017;153(10):1036-42.
13. Mangano K, Vergalito F, Mammana S, Mariano A, De Pasquale R, Meloscia A, et al.Evaluation of hyaluronic acid-P40 conjugated cream in a mouse model of dermatitis induced by oxazolone. Exp Ther Med. 2017;14(3):2439-44.
14. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Research Milani et al., J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 2017, 8:6

DOI: 10.4172/2155-9554.1000426

1. Belkaid Y, Hand TW. Role of the microbiota in immunity and inflammation. Cell. 2014;157(1):121-41.
2. Grice EA, Kong HH, Conlan S, Deming CB, Davis J, Young AC, et al. Topographical and temporal diversity of the human skin microbiome. Science. 2009;324(5931):1190-2.
3. Lee N, Kim WU. Microbiota in T-cell homeostasis and inflammatory diseases. Exp Mol Med. 2017;49(5):e340.
4. Gallo RL. Human skin is the largest epithelial surface for interaction with microbes. J Invest Dermatol. 2017;137:1213-1214.
5. Cogen AL, Nizet V, Gallo RL. Skin microbiota: a source of disease or defence?.Br J Dermatol. 2008; 158(3):442-55.
6. Teruaki Nakatsuji, Richard L. Gallo. The role of the skin microbiome in atopic dermatitis. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology 2018. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2018.12.003
7. Geoghegan JA, Irvine AD, Foster TJ. Staphylococcus aureus and Atopic Dermatitis: A Complex and Evolving Relationship. Trends Microbiol.2018;26(6):484-97.
8. Nutten S. Atopic dermatitis: global epidemiology and risk factors. Ann Nutr Metab.2015;66 Suppl 1:8-16.
9. Lifschitz C. The impact of atopic dermatitis on quality of life. Ann Nutr Metab.2015;66 Suppl 1:34-40.
10. Fernandez JM, Fernandez AP, Lang DM. Biologic Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Skin Disorders. Immunol Allergy Clin North Am. 2017;37(2):315-27
11. Coondoo A, Phiske M, Verma S, Lahiri K. Side-effects of topical steroids: A long overdue revisit. Indian Dermatol Online J. 2014;5(4):416-25.
12. Li AW, Yin ES, Antaya RJ. Topical Corticosteroid Phobia in Atopic Dermatitis: A Systematic Review. JAMA Dermatol. 2017;153(10):1036-42.
13. Mangano K, Vergalito F, Mammana S, Mariano A, De Pasquale R, Meloscia A, et al.Evaluation of hyaluronic acid-P40 conjugated cream in a mouse model of dermatitis induced by oxazolone. Exp Ther Med. 2017;14(3):2439-44.
14. Journal of Clinical & Experimental Dermatology Research Milani et al., J Clin Exp Dermatol Res 2017, 8:6

DOI: 10.4172/2155-9554.1000426